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Researchers Predict More Frequent, Severe Megastorms Due to Climate Change

A study last week predicts that massive, often-devastating “hundred-year storms” may occur three times as often and be 20% more severe in the U.S. due to climate change. The researchers, in a paper published in the American Geophysical Union journal Earth’s Future, found that if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase at a rapid rate, the continental U.S. would likely see such mega-storms every 33 years.

The occurrence of historic rainfall events, like the ones that caused Hurricane Harvey in 2017 and California’s Great Flood of 1862, are likely to increase faster than lower-magnitude events, which already happen about every decade, according to UCLA climate scientist Daniel Swain.

Coronavirus Lockdown Caused Dramatic Changes in Water Consumption, Research Finds

New research has found that the coronavirus lockdown led to dramatic changes in water consumption in England and Wales, and that some of these are likely to continue even after the pandemic.

Science Group Issues Valley-Focused Advice on Climate Change

The San Joaquin Valley has received a specially addressed message from the Union of Concerned Scientists about what it thinks people across the region should be doing about looming water shortages, worsening air quality and generally more volatile weather in the years ahead.

How Testing Sewage Could Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

All across the country, counties, colleges and other communities are now testing sewage to monitor the spread of the novel coronavirus. According to experts, COVID-19 can show up in wastewater about a week before people even show symptoms.

California Could Do Better to Ease the Burdens of Wildfires If We Knew How Much They Actually Cost

Amid a record-breaking fire year, a new report out Thursday says the state lacks a grasp on the true costs of wildfires. The report is from the California Council on Science and Technology, an independent nonprofit organization established to offer state leaders objective advice from scientists and research institutions.

Droughts That Start Over the Ocean? They’re Often Worse Than Those That Form Over Land

Droughts usually evoke visions of cracked earth, withered crops, dried-up rivers and dust storms. But droughts can also form over oceans, and when they then move ashore they are often more intense and longer-lasting than purely land-born dry spells.

Opinion: Wildfires and Soaring Temperatures — the Hellscape Scientists Warned Us About is Here

After an extended weekend of wildfires, part of an early fire season that has already seen a record 2 million acres burned and Death Valley-like temperatures smothering the San Fernando Valley, Californians would be right to wonder whether we are living in a hellscape. We are not, it’s safe to say. But we are living in the future that climate scientists have been trying to warn us about for years now.

A New Kind of College Exam: UCSD is Testing Sewage for COVID-19

Turds tell tales, and UC San Diego is listening.

As the beginning of the school year nears, the university is preparing to ramp up its testing of sewage for the coronavirus. The goal: Monitor the progress of the pandemic on campus and catch outbreaks before it’s too late to control them. Along those lines, UCSD on Saturday sent out its first campus-wide email alert about the detection of the virus in sewage from one of its seven colleges.

Water, Water, Every Where — And Now Scientists Know Where it Came From

Water on Earth is omnipresent and essential for life as we know it, and yet scientists remain a bit baffled about where all of this water came from: Was it present when the planet formed, or did the planet form dry and only later get its water from impacts with water-rich objects such as comets?

A new study in the journal Science suggests that the Earth likely got a lot of its precious water from the original materials that built the planet, instead of having water arrive later from afar.

Emily Castiglione's winning poster She is an eighth grade student at Joan MacQueen Middle School in Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD Water Is Life

Student Art Brings Life to ‘Water Is Life’ Contest

Eight talented East County student artists used their creative skills to depict the importance of water in Padre Dam Municipal Water District’s annual Kids Poster Contest.

The theme ‘Water Is Life’ asked students to express the value of water in their lives. They could draw, paint, color, cut, or paste original artwork depicting the theme in any way.

Students were honored at the June 17 Padre Dam virtual board meeting online, and the youngsters were featured along with their work in a video.

“Our Annual Water Is Life Poster Contest is a great opportunity for students to learn about the importance of using water wisely and we are thrilled to celebrate this year’s winning young artists,” said Melissa McChesney, Padre Dam communications manager. “These students did a wonderful job capturing the value of water in beautiful works of art.”

The 2020 contest winners:

Hailey Ramirez – First Grade, Pepper Drive Elementary School, El Cajon Water Is Life

Hailey Ramirez – First Grade, Pepper Drive Elementary School, El Cajon. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

 

Letty Damyanov – Third Grade, PRIDE Academy, Santee. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

Letty Damyanov – Third Grade, PRIDE Academy, Santee. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

Water is Life

Violet Jacobson – Fourth Grade, Hill Creek School, Santee. Photo: Padre Dam MWD Water Is Life

Violet Jacobson – Fourth Grade, Hill Creek School, Santee. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

 

Sarah McGregor – Fifth grade, Chet F. Harritt Elementary School, Santee. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

Sarah McGregor – Fifth grade, Chet F. Harritt Elementary School, Santee. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

 

Sarah Bernier – Sixth Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD Water Is Life

Sarah Bernier – Sixth Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

 

Gianna Casillas – Eight Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

Gianna Casillas – Eighth Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

 

Angelina Casillas – Eighth Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

Angelina Casillas – Eighth Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

 

Emily Castiglione - Eighth Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

Emily Castiglione – Eighth Grade, Joan MacQueen Middle School, Alpine. Photo: Padre Dam MWD

Poster contest part of new Kids Corner program

The ‘Water Is Life’ annual poster contest is among the fun, educational summer activities included in Padre Dam’s new Kids Corner online. The web page offers a variety of water-based activities including online games, activity sheets, videos, hands-on experiments, and more. These projects are suitable for all grade levels from kindergarten through high school.

McChesney said the District is working to add new activities to involve kids and their parents in learning about science. Kids Corner is part of Padre Dam’s website.
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