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Dr. Malcolm Dunstan of MAD & Associates represents the team including the Water Authority at the award ceremony, MAD & Associates led the RCC mix design for the San Vicente Dam Raise project. Photo: International Commission on Large Dams

San Vicente Dam Raise Wins Global Award

The International Commission on Large Dams presented the San Diego County Water Authority this week with a prestigious international engineering award for its innovative construction technology used to raise the historic San Vicente Dam. The project helps ensure regional water security for generations to come.

Commission leaders made the presentation to the Water Authority at its annual conference in Guangzhou, China. It cited a special type of construction called roller compacted concrete, or RCC.  Applying this method to the San Vincente Dam project simplified construction, saving both time and money. The completed dam structure is capable of withstanding a 7.5 magnitude earthquake.

Dr. Malcolm Dunstan of MAD & Associates accepts the San Vicente Dam Raise award from International Commission on Large Dams officials. Photo: International Commission on Large Dams

Dr. Malcolm Dunstan of MAD & Associates accepts the San Vicente Dam Raise award from International Commission on Large Dams officials. Photo: International Commission on Large Dams

“This award is a reminder that the San Diego region has a long history of strategic investments to
protect our most important natural resource,” said Water Authority Board Chair Mel Katz. “The
San Vicente Dam Raise was a landmark project and one that inspires us as we seek solutions to
current and future challenges.”

The Water Authority sent a video message to the conference. View it below.

San Vicente Dam Project Increases Water Storage Capacity

Completed in 2014, the dam raise project increased the height of San Vicente Dam by 117 feet, the equivalent of adding a 12-story building atop the original structure. It more than doubled the capacity of the San Vicente Reservoir by adding 152,000-acre feet of water storage capacity, enough to serve more than 450,000 households for a year.

San Vicente Dam has been owned and operated by the City of San Diego since it was built in 1943. Capacity in the enlarged reservoir is shared by the city and the Water Authority, which also share the cost of operating the reservoir.

“Raising the San Vicente Dam was a massive feat of engineering and it’s recognized as the world’s tallest dam extension using roller compacted concrete,” said Water Authority Engineering Director Neena Kuzmich. “More importantly, it was the final major element of the Water Authority’s $1.5 billion Emergency Storage Project, a system of reservoirs, pipelines and pumping stations designed to secure a six-month supply of drinking water for the San Diego region in case a natural disaster such as an earthquake or a prolonged drought interrupts imported water deliveries.”

State-Of-The-Art Method Shortens Construction Time

The San Vicente Dam Raise, completed in 2014, added more than 157,000 acre-feet of regional water storage capacity – the largest increase in San Diego County history. Photo: San Diego County Water Authority

The San Vicente Dam Raise, completed in 2014, added more than 157,000 acre-feet of regional water storage capacity – the largest increase in San Diego County history. Photo: San Diego County Water Authority

Work to prepare the original dam and foundation for the expansion began in 2009. Using RCC for the expansion was a key design element. Unlike conventional wet concrete, which is poured, RCC uses less cement and water to create a cookie dough or clay-like texture. Equally as strong as wet concrete, RCC is placed in layers one on top of the other and compacted. The placement process resembles road construction.

This state-of-the art application method significantly shortens construction time while meeting
all technical requirements. Expansion was completed in 2014. The San Vicente Reservoir is located just outside of Lakeside and now stands 337 feet tall.

Yuba Water Agency Approves $39 Million for Power Plant Project

In a unanimous vote, the Yuba Water Agency Board of Directors approved a $39.46 million budget on Tuesday for the Power Systems Headquarters facility, a power plant project which will allow current staff and future hires to work in an upgraded workspace.

Progress on City of San Diego’s Pure Water Pipeline to Temporarily Impact Water Activities at Miramar Reservoir

SAN DIEGO – As the City of San Diego continues to make major progress on one of the largest infrastructure projects in the City’s history, there will be temporary impacts to some water activities at Miramar Reservoir. For the safety of residents and visitors, water activities at Miramar will be suspended beginning next week through early 2023 due to pipeline construction work for the Pure Water Program. Shore areas, including picnic and barbecue areas, paths and shore fishing, will remain accessible to the public during the project.

Water activities will also be suspended in mid-2023 during a second phase of the pipeline project. During these two construction periods, boats, canoes, kayaks and float tubes will not be allowed. The 1-mile pipeline at Miramar Reservoir will include pipeline assembly on barges on the surface of the reservoir before being sunk and permanently installed underwater. The first phase of construction includes the completion of tunneling into the reservoir (mid-November 2022 to early 2023) and the second phase, starting mid-2023, will include the construction of the pipeline on the reservoir.

“This pipeline project is a crucial part of the Pure Water Program that will be vital to providing drinking water in the future,” said Juan Guerreiro, Director of the City’s Public Utilities Department. “We are focused on limiting the impacts to our facilities while this work is underway, and we appreciate the public’s patience during the construction phases.”

The project team will work to minimize inconveniences associated with traffic, construction noise and large construction equipment, but please plan extra time for parking when visiting the reservoir.

Pure Water San Diego is the City’s phased, multi-year program that will provide nearly half of our water supply locally by 2035. Pure Water will use proven purification technology to clean recycled water and produce safe, high-quality drinking water. The program offers a cost effective investment for San Diego’s water needs and will provide a reliable, sustainable water supply.

Mac Dad Builders Given CWA Construction Contract for Dulin Hill Erosion Repair

Mac Dad Builders, Inc., has been given the San Diego County Water Authority construction contract for the Dulin Hill Erosion Repair project.

The SDCWA board vote Aug. 25 authorized CWA general manager Sandra Kerl or her designee to award a $1,965,884 construction contract to Mac Dad Builders, which is based in Irvine. The Dulin Hill Erosion Repair project will repair existing erosion located along the Second Aqueduct on Dulin Hill south of the San Luis Rey River.

Olivenhain Municipal Water District Logo landscape design workshops

Manchester Pipeline Projects Continue with Installation of Recycled Water Pipeline

Encinitas, Calif. — Olivenhain Municipal Water District is beginning construction this week on a new recycled water pipeline in Encinitas along Manchester Avenue and South El Camino Real from Via Poco to Tennis Club Drive. Once complete, customers connecting to this new pipeline will irrigate with recycled water, which will reduce demand for imported potable water by more than 10 million gallons every year.

Recycled water is a sustainable water source that reduces the region’s dependence on imported water. OMWD is currently meeting approximately 14% of its total water demands using locally supplied recycled water for irrigation.

Olivenhain Municipal Water District Logo landscape design workshops

OMWD Recognized for Construction Projects to Ensure Water Reliability

Encinitas, Calif. — Olivenhain Municipal Water District’s Indian Head Canyon Pipeline Restoration Project and El Camino Real Potable Water Pipeline Replacement Project were both recognized today as 2022 Projects of the Year by American Public Works Association’s San Diego and Imperial County Chapter at its awards event in Mission Valley.

“OMWD takes great pride in providing uninterrupted water service to our customers,” said OMWD Board President Larry Watt. “Replacing and repairing infrastructure before it fails helps to avoid emergency repairs, which is a more cost-effective and less impactful approach.”

Phase I Construction-Construction of major water infrastructure for Phase 1 of Pure Water San Diego including pipelines, pump stations and treatment facilities is now taking place in the Morena, Bay Park, Clairemont, University City, Miramar and Scripps Ranch communities. Construction affects

Pure Water San Diego Phase 1 Construction in North City Area

Construction work is underway in several areas of San Diego, building major infrastructure projects for Phase 1 of Pure Water San Diego.

Phase 1 of Pure Water San Diego, including pipelines, pump stations, and treatment facilities, has started in Morena, Bay Park, Clairemont, University City, Miramar, and Scripps Ranch communities. It is a milestone toward the realization of securing a local, drought-resilient water supply for San Diegans for generations to come.

Nearly 50% of San Diego’s water supply

Pure Water is the City of San Diego’s largest-ever infrastructure program that will provide nearly half of San Diego’s water supply by 2035. Pure Water will use purification technology to clean recycled wastewater and is a cost-effective investment for San Diego’s water supply needs.

Residents, businesses, and commuters may be impacted by road closures, detours, and construction noise during construction. Construction for this project will primarily take place on weeknights from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m., except on Nobel Drive, when construction will take place on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tunneling work will be done around the clock with adherence to noise requirements.

Pure Water project will reduce dependence on imported water

“Potholing” is underground work that finds the location and depth of existing utilities in the public right-of-way. Potholing is currently being done for the Morena Northern Pipeline & Tunnels and the North City Pure Water San Diego Pipeline projects. Photo: City of San Diego Construction affects

“Potholing” is underground work that finds the location and depth of existing utilities in the public right-of-way. Potholing is currently being done for the Morena Northern Pipeline & Tunnels and the North City Pure Water San Diego Pipeline projects. Photo: City of San Diego

Upon its completion, Pure Water San Diego will contribute 30 million gallons per day of high-quality purified water, reducing the City’s dependence on imported water.

The Morena Northern Pipelines and Tunnels project now underway will connect to the Morena Pipelines Middle Alignment to the south and the North City Water Reclamation Plant to the north.

Water pipelines

This project includes portions of two 10.5-mile pipelines: one 48-inch wastewater pipeline, which will carry wastewater north to the North City facilities for purification, and one 30-inch brine line that will carry the byproduct from water purification south to the Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant.

This project begins on Genesee Avenue and Appleton Street and continues on Genesee Avenue, Nobel Drive, Towne Centre Drive, and Executive Drive. Tunneling will be completed at Genesee Avenue and State Route 52 (San Clemente Creek), at Genesee Avenue and Rose Creek Canyon, and under Interstate 805.

Securing San Diego’s sustainable water future

This project begins on Genesee Avenue and Appleton Street and continues on Genesee Avenue, Nobel Drive, Towne Centre Drive, and Executive Drive. Tunneling will be completed at Genesee Avenue and State Route 52 (San Clemente Creek), at Genesee Avenue and Rose Creek Canyon, and under Interstate 805. Map: City of San Diego

Currently, the City of San Diego depends primarily on a reliable imported water supply to deliver clean and safe drinking water to its communities. The investment in advanced water purification with the construction of Pure Water San Diego will help secure a high-quality, safe, local, and drought-proof water supply for the future. Phase 1 is scheduled to be completed and commence operation in 2024. Pure Water San Diego will eventually provide nearly half of San Diego’s water supply locally by 2035 with the completion of Phase 2.

Purified water produced at the completed plant will be delivered to the Miramar Reservoir, blended with the City of San Diego’s imported and local water sources, and treated again at the existing Miramar Water Treatment Plant. After this process, the water will be distributed to customers.

You can take a virtual tour of Pure Water San Diego’s demonstration facility at virtualtour.purewatersd.org More information about the Program can be found at www.purewatersd.org.

(Editor’s Note: The City of San Diego is one of the San Diego County Water Authority’s 24 member agencies that deliver water across the metropolitan San Diego region.)

RMWD Adds Cultural and Tribal Monitoring Consultant Tasks to Rice Canyon Pipeline Project

The Rainbow Municipal Water District’s Rice Canyon Pipeline project will have cultural and tribal monitoring during construction.

The official Rainbow board action Dec. 7, which was approved on a 4-0 vote with Pam Moss absent, approves a change order to the as-needed consulting services contract the district has with Helix Environmental Planning. The board also appropriated an additional $115,000 to cover the cost of the cultural and tribal consulting work.

Construction to Begin on Pure Water Soquel Purification Plant

Officials on Friday marked the beginning of construction on the Chanticleer Water Purification plant — the “heart” of the Pure Water Soquel project — where treated wastewater will undergo further purification before it is injected back underground.

The recycling process will provide a buffer against seawater contamination, bolster drinking water supplies and raise groundwater levels that are depleted after decades of overuse.

$1 Billion Project to Expand Major Bay Area Reservoir Gains Momentum

The rolling hills and ranchlands of eastern Contra Costa County are known for wineries, cattle ranches, wind turbines and growing subdivisions.

But soon they may be known for something else: The biggest new water storage project in the Bay Area in years. And now, amid the current drought, nearly every major water agency in the region wants a piece of it.