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New video-Olivenhain Municipal Water District-OMWD-Water quality continues to exceed state and federal standards. In addition, due to preventative maintenance, overall water loss decreased in 2021 at the Olivenhain Municipal Water District. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District New Video highlights

New Video Highlights Olivenhain Municipal Water District Achievements in 2021

In its ongoing effort to keep ratepayers and the community informed, the Olivenhain Municipal Water District produced its first “Year In Review” video report for 2021.

The video showcases key achievements of the District, using an accessible digital video format to share details, images, and key facts with ratepayers through a familiar, trusted online platform posted to the District’s YouTube channel.

“Most customers are not aware of the numerous projects and developments ongoing at OMWD, so this video is a great way to package all our wins into one place for easy viewing,” said Joe Jansen, OMWD administrative analyst.

Jansen said many of the District’s fiscal accomplishments aren’t readily visible to the public like infrastructure projects.

“Videos are great informational tools to help keep our residents informed of everything we do and to help build trust with us as their water provider,” said Jansen.

Eight achievements highlighted in the video

  1. OMWD received an AAA bond rating from Fitch Ratings.
  2. OMWD received over $3.6 million in refunds to be credited to customers over the next several years. Funds will be added to the Rate Stabilization Fund and applied as a direct credit to customers’ water bills over the next several years.
  3. OMWD achieved over $1.3 million of state and federal grant funds. Funding will offset the costs of important projects for ratepayers.
  4. OMWD continues to receive the highest recognition from industry groups. Awards recognize the District for its fiscal governance and infrastructure projects.
  5. Water quality continues to exceed state and federal standards. In addition, due to preventative maintenance, overall water loss decreased in 2021.
  6. OMWD completed a pilot study on developing a local water supply through groundwater desalination. Results were favorable from the grant-funded project and the District will continue to assess the project’s feasibility.
  7. OMWD completed several replacement and upgrade projects at its 4S Ranch Water Reclamation Facility.
  8. Proactive measures were taken to combat the spread of COVID-19. As a result, OMWD had no interruption to customer service and has completed all vital projects during the past year.
In 2021, the Olivenhain Municipal Water District completed several replacement and upgrade projects at its 4S Ranch Water Reclamation Facility. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District New Video highlights

In 2021, the Olivenhain Municipal Water District completed several replacement and upgrade projects at its 4S Ranch Water Reclamation Facility. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District

Award finalist in ACWA 2021 Huell Howser Excellence in Communication Award

(L to R) Board member Neal Meyers, GM Kim Thorner, treasurer Christy Guerin, customer service manager John Carnegie, board member Lawrence Watt, and assistant GM Joey Randall receive ACWA's 2021 Huell Howser Excellence in Communication Award.. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District

(L to R) Board member Neal Meyers, GM Kim Thorner, treasurer Christy Guerin, customer service manager John Carnegie, board member Lawrence Watt, and assistant GM Joey Randall receive recognition as finalists for ACWA’s 2021 Huell Howser Excellence in Communication Award. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District

(Editor’s note: The Olivenhain Municipal Water District is one of the San Diego County Water Authority’s 24 member agencies that deliver water across the metropolitan San Diego region.)

In a Drying West, Utah Governor Proposes Major Water Investments

Utah Gov. Spencer Cox (R) unveiled his $25 billion budget proposal last month near what was once the shore of the Great Salt Lake. But instead of waves lapping behind him, the waterline was barely visible in the distance.

Marin Utility Considers Delaying Water Pipeline Project

With its reservoirs nearly refilled, the Marin Municipal Water District is considering delaying a proposed $100 million project to build an emergency water pipeline across the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge.

Large Water Pipeline in Kings County Raising Questions, Concerns

A large water pipeline being built near Lemoore in Kings County is raising eyebrows as much for its possible uses as for the name associated with its construction — John Vidovich.

Manchester Avenue Pipeline Replacement Project Underway in Encinitas

Work is progressing toward completion on the first of two pipeline replacement projects in Encinitas by Olivenhain Municipal Water District.

Replacement of an existing drinking water pipeline is wrapping up at Rancho Santa Fe Road and Encinitas Boulevard, with completion expected in early 2022. The original pipeline was installed in 1961 and was approaching the end of its lifespan. Proactively replacing aging water pipelines prevents leaks and avoids emergency shutdowns.

Pipeline project-Olivenhain Municipal Water District-infrastructure-pipeline replacement

Manchester Avenue Pipeline Replacement Project Underway in Encinitas

Work is progressing toward completion on the first of two pipeline replacement projects in Encinitas by Olivenhain Municipal Water District.

Replacement of an existing drinking water pipeline is wrapping up at Rancho Santa Fe Road and Encinitas Boulevard, with completion expected in early 2022. The original pipeline was installed in 1961 and was approaching the end of its lifespan. Proactively replacing aging water pipelines prevents leaks and avoids emergency shutdowns.

“Water main breaks can waste millions of gallons of treated water while requiring costly emergency repairs,” said Bob Topolovac, Olivenhain Municipal Water District Board director. “That is why this project is critical in ensuring safe and reliable water delivery to our customers.”

To minimize the impact on the surrounding community, construction is taking place mainly at night, except in residential areas where work takes place during the day. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District

To minimize the impact on the surrounding community, construction is taking place mainly at night, except in residential areas where work takes place during the day. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District

Pipelines being replaced include:

  • Approximately 1,900 linear feet of 12-inch pipeline in Manchester Avenue from Colony Terrace north to Encinitas Boulevard
  • Approximately 450 linear feet of 12-inch pipeline in Encinitas Boulevard west of Rancho Santa Fe Road
  • Approximately 500 linear feet of 12-inch pipeline in Rancho Santa Fe Road north of Encinitas Boulevard
  • Approximately 850 linear feet of eight-inch pipeline in South Rancho Santa Fe Road

To minimize the impact on the surrounding community, construction is taking place mainly at night, except in residential areas where work takes place during the day.

Learn more about the project and upcoming work in 2022 in this video

Recycled water pipeline helps reduce drinking water demand

In early 2022, the water district will begin its second project, installing 1.4 miles of six-inch recycled water pipeline under Manchester Avenue and S. El Camino Real. When completed, recycled water will be connected to the San Elijo Joint Powers Authority’s Recycled Water Pipeline and North Plant. It will be part of the North San Diego Water Reuse Coalition’s Regional Recycled Water Project.

Homeowner associations, schools, and businesses along the project alignment that are currently using potable water for landscape irrigation will be able to take advantage of this lower-cost, drought-resistant local source of water for irrigation. These new customers connecting to this pipeline will reduce the need for 10 million gallons of potable drinking water per year.

OMWD is coordinating its work with Caltrans to minimize traffic impacts to the Manchester Avenue Corridor. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water DistrictOMWD is coordinating its work with Caltrans to minimize traffic impacts to the Manchester Avenue Corridor. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District

The Olivenhain Municipal Water District is coordinating its work with Caltrans to minimize traffic impacts to the Manchester Avenue Corridor. Photo: Olivenhain Municipal Water District

Multiagency coordination on pipeline replacement

The pipeline will be installed along Manchester Avenue between Via Poco and Tennis Club Drive. Since Caltrans is working at I-5 and Via Poco, the water district is coordinating its work with Caltrans to minimize traffic impacts to the Manchester Avenue Corridor.

Construction is expected to take nine months. The project received approximately $1.75 million in state and federal grant funding, reducing costs for its ratepayers.

Prior to construction in summer 2021, the Olivenhain Municipal Water District hosted a virtual neighborhood meeting. Staff provided project details and steps that will be taken to reduce impacts to the community and sought input from members of the public. Video of the meeting can be viewed here. (NOTE: some of the scheduling information has changed).

The project is expected to be completed in early 2023. Project updates can be found at www.olivenhain.com/projects. For questions or concerns, email or call 760-632-4235.

(Editor’s note: The Olivenhain Municipal Water District is one of the San Diego County Water Authority’s 24 member agencies that deliver water across the metropolitan San Diego region.)

Biden Administration Moves to Scrap Cadiz Water Pipeline Right-Of-Way Permit, Cleared by Trump

Federal authorities have moved to reverse a Trump administration decision that cleared the way for Cadiz Inc. to pipe water across public land in the California desert.

The request filed in federal court Friday, which must still be granted, could deal a blow to the company’s decades-long effort to pump groundwater from beneath its desert property 200 miles east of Los Angeles and sell it to urban Southern California. The project is fiercely opposed by conservationists, who say it will dry up desert springs and seeps relied upon by Indigenous tribes and rare wildlife. Cadiz insists its plans won’t harm springs in the area.

Billions for Climate Protection Fuel New Debate: Who Deserves It Most

The new infrastructure law signed by President Biden includes almost $50 billion to protect communities against climate change, the largest such investment in United States history and a recognition that the effects of warming are outpacing America’s ability to cope.

Mr. Biden has insisted that at least 40 percent of the benefits of federal climate spending will reach underserved places, which tend to be low-income, rural, communities of color, or some combination of the three.

Miles of Aging Water Lines Remain Under San Diego

City and Caltrans crews remained at work in downtown Tuesday, cleaning up the mess after two water main breaks on Sunday closed freeway on-ramps and flooded businesses.

The first break came from a 76-year-old cast iron pipe near 11th and A street, which flooded local businesses and snarled traffic. Some time later, a 62-year-old concrete steel cylinder pipe failed near balboa park.

Infrastructure Week is Finally Here. What California Will Get

Washington has become known as the town where nothing gets done. But Congress on Nov. 5 approved a bipartisan $1.2-trillion infrastructure bill that lawmakers say will expand access to high-speed internet, rebuild old roads and bridges and create networks of electric car charging stations. Biden is scheduled to sign the bill Monday during a ceremony at the White House.