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San Diego County, Water Authority Partner on Efficiency Rebates

Residents and businesses in unincorporated areas of San Diego County are eligible for increased water-use efficiency rebates under a partnership announced Aug. 17 between the county’s Watershed Protection Program and the San Diego County Water Authority.

The program could save money for residential, commercial and agricultural customers who make landscape upgrades designed to improve the region’s climate resilience and reduce the flow of pollutants into waterways.

“Drought conditions across the west are a reminder of the importance of water-efficiency upgrades, and these rebates offer a great opportunity to get involved,” said Kelley Gage, director of water resources for the water authority. “With a WaterSmart approach, we can reduce water-use and maintain climate-friendly landscapes that help sustain our quality of life in San Diego County.”

New Partnership Promotes WaterSmart Landscapes, Healthy Watersheds in San Diego County

Residents and businesses in unincorporated areas of San Diego County are eligible for increased water-use efficiency rebates under a new partnership between the County’s Watershed Protection Program and the San Diego County Water Authority.

The County’s new Waterscape Rebate Program will save money for residential, commercial, and agricultural customers who make landscape upgrades that improve the region’s climate resilience and reduce the flow of pollutants into waterways.

Watersheds-Rebates-New Partnership-WaterSmart

New Partnership Promotes WaterSmart Landscapes, Healthy Watersheds in San Diego County

Residents and businesses in unincorporated areas of San Diego County are eligible for increased water-use efficiency rebates under a new partnership between the County’s Watershed Protection Program and the San Diego County Water Authority.

The County’s new Waterscape Rebate Program will save money for residential, commercial, and agricultural customers who make landscape upgrades that improve the region’s climate resilience and reduce the flow of pollutants into waterways. Sustainable landscapes produce multiple benefits for San Diego communities, such as reducing water use, enhancing habitat, increasing stormwater retention, and decreasing run-off.

Increased rebates with new partnership

The newly enhanced incentives include rebates that start at $3 per square foot for turf replacement, $60 per smart controller station, $65 per rain barrel and up to $450 per cistern. The agencies are also offering technical assistance to upgrade larger landscapes on multifamily and commercial properties, and a cost-share with agricultural growers to make water-saving upgrades.

Water customers in unincorporated San Diego County can determine their eligibility at: SanDiegoCounty.gov/WatershedRebates.

For the past 30 years, the Water Authority and its member agencies have promoted water-use efficiency through a variety of tools such as rebates, classes, and other resources available across their service areas. Landscaping upgrades are particularly important because more than half of all residential water use is outdoors. Some cities and water agencies in the region choose to increase the rebates like the County is doing for residents in unincorporated areas. Rebates, classes and incentives available to all residents in the San Diego metropolitan area are also at www.watersmartsd.org.

Drought conditions across the West are a reminder of the importance of water-efficiency upgrades, and these rebates offer a great opportunity to get involved,” said Kelley Gage, Director of Water Resources for the San Diego County Water Authority. “With a WaterSmart approach, we can reduce water-use and maintain climate-friendly landscapes that help sustain our quality of life in San Diego County.”

Maximize your yard. Minimize your bills

The new partnership is part of the County’s new Waterscape Rebate Program, which helps to protect local waterways by reducing pollutants that enter storm drains. The program includes outreach and education to commercial, industrial, and residential properties in unincorporated areas of the county. In addition to the programs administered by the Water Authority, the County is offering programs with rebates for upgrades including rain gardens, gutters, permeable pavement, and regular septic system pumping.

Project Clean Water

“The County is committed to reducing stormwater pollution to help protect water and foster healthy communities,” said Scott Norris, Land Use Environmental Planning Manager at the County of San Diego. “Partnering with the Water Authority allows us to offer even more resources to help unincorporated residents and business owners upgrade their properties with incentives that can cover a large portion of the costs and actively contribute to protecting our waterways for everyone.”

To learn about how individual actions can promote clean water and healthier communities, and to take the “52 Ways to Love Your Water” pledge, go to: www.projectcleanwater.org/

New Partnership Promotes WaterSmart Landscapes and Healthy Watersheds in S.D. County

August 17, 2021 – Residents and businesses in unincorporated areas of San Diego County are eligible for increased water-use efficiency rebates under a new partnership between the County’s Watershed Protection Program and the San Diego County Water Authority.

The County’s new Waterscape Rebate Program will save money for residential, commercial, and agricultural customers who make landscape upgrades that improve the region’s climate resilience and reduce the flow of pollutants into waterways. Sustainable landscapes produce multiple benefits for San Diego communities, such as reducing water use, enhancing habitat, increasing stormwater retention, and decreasing run-off.

Thousands of Central Valley Farmers May Lose Access to Surface Water Amid Worsening Drought

As California endures an increasingly brutal second year of drought, state water regulators are considering an emergency order that would bar thousands of Central Valley farmers from using stream and river water to irrigate their crops.

Lake Jennings 2021 Spring Photo Contest Winners Depict Life At The Lake

The theme “Life at the Lake” inspired 61 photographers to enter the 2021 Lake Jennings Spring Photo Contest, held for the 10th year by the Helix Water District. Photographer Johnathan Bradley of Lemon Grove won first place for his image titled “Open Field” and second place for the photo “Sun Star.” Third place went to Jeff Morin for “Ladies On  A Lunch Break.”

Each of the entries highlighted the unique beauty of Lake Jennings activities enjoyed by locals and visitors, including camping, fishing, hiking, spotting wildlife, and enjoying the view.

San Diego to Create Regional Park in Long-Neglected Chollas Creek Area in Southeastern San Diego

San Diego’s recent push to boost its poorest, most parks-deficient neighborhoods will accelerate this summer when the city designates much of southeastern San Diego as Chollas Creek Regional Park.

Helix Water District-Lake Jennings-Winners-Photo Contest

Lake Jennings 2021 Spring Photo Contest Winners Depict Life At The Lake

The theme “Life at the Lake” inspired 61 photographers to enter the 2021 Lake Jennings Spring Photo Contest, held for the 10th year by the Helix Water District.

Photographer Johnathan Bradley of Lemon Grove won first place for his image titled “Open Field” and second place for the photo “Sun Star.” Third place went to Jeff Morin for “Ladies On  A Lunch Break.”

Each of the entries highlighted the unique beauty of Lake Jennings activities enjoyed by locals and visitors, including camping, fishing, hiking, spotting wildlife, and enjoying the view. The contest was open for photos taken between March 1 and May 31, 2021. Eleven entries from March 2020 were included since they were entered before Lake Jennings closed due to the pandemic.

“This year’s contest had photographers from all over the county and even some international participants,” said Kira Haley, Lake Jennings recreation manager. “Our photo contest visitors brought the lake to life through their experiences camping, fishing, watching wildlife, and exploring the many trails and vistas of the lake.”

Adult Category Winners

Johnathan Bradley, "Open Field." Photo: Helix Water DistrictSpring Photo Contest

First Place – Johnathan Bradley – “Open Field”

Second Place – Johnathan Bradley, "Sun Star" Spring Photo Contest

Second Place – Johnathan Bradley – “Sun Star”

Third Place – Jeff Morin, "Ladies on a Lunch Break" Spring Photo Contest

Third Place – Jeff Morin – “Ladies on a Lunch Break”

Honorable Mention – Erik Hyman, "Deep Pier"

Honorable Mention – Erik Hyman –”Deep Pier”

Youth Category Winners

First Place – Aaron De’Souza – "Cacti by the Lake"

First Place – Aaron De’Souza – “Cacti by the Lake”

Second Place – Gabriel Heilpern, "Fishing on the Lake"

Second Place – Gabriel Heilpern – “Fishing on the Lake”

The winning photos are also available on Lake Jennings’ Facebook page and the District’s website.

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Watershed Survey Helps Maintain San Diego Regional Water Quality

The City of San Diego Public Utilities Department conducts regular surveys of its watersheds to monitor and maintain high water quality within those watersheds. The City recently released its 2020 Watershed Sanitary Survey. Conducted and issued every five years since 1996 as required by California law, the report identifies actual or potential causes of local source water contamination that might adversely affect the quality and treatability of City of San Diego water.

California Weighs Changes for New Water Rights Permits in Response to a Warmer and Drier Climate

As California’s seasons become warmer and drier, state officials are pondering whether the water rights permitting system needs revising to better reflect the reality of climate change’s effect on the timing and volume of the state’s water supply. A report for the State Water Resources Control Board recommends tailoring new water rights permits to California’s increasingly volatile hydrology. And it warns that the increasingly whiplash nature of California’s changing climate could require existing rights holders to curtail diversions more often and in more watersheds — or open opportunities to grab more water in climate-induced floods.