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Water Use Drops Nearly 32% Per Capita in Manteca Copy

Manteca’s daily per capita use of water in 2019 was down 31.8 percent compared to 2013.

That means Manteca is now exceeding the water conservation goal of 30 percent established by the state at the height of the drought. Mantecans used 195.5 gallons per capita in 2013 compared to 133.3 gallons in 2019.

Water Use Drops Nearly 32% Per Capita in Manteca

Manteca’s daily per capita use of water in 2019 was down 31.8 percent compared to 2013.

That means Manteca is now exceeding the water conservation goal of 30 percent established by the state at the height of the drought. Mantecans used 195.5 gallons per capita in 2013 compared to 133.3 gallons in 2019.

Opinion: Colorado River Basin States Need to Cut Water Use

A longtime water conservation advocate says Arizona and the other Lower Colorado River Basin states need to cut their water use more and faster.

Sustainable Waters president Brian Richter says Arizona, California, and Nevada need to slash total water use by 18% from their 2000-2018 average to bring Lakes Mead and Powell into a long-term state of balance, the Arizona Daily Star reports. He says the decrease would push the river’s falling reservoirs into sustainability.

Leaky indoor faucet - Shutterstock

Helix Water District, Sweetwater Authority Offer Smart Leak Detector Rebates

The Helix Water District has rolled out a new smart leak detector rebate program. Helix and Sweetwater Authority customers can get a rebate of up to $100 when they purchase a smart leak detector.

The detectors sync to smartphones, allowing customers to monitor water use 24/7 via smartphone and the devices notify customers of leaks and water consumption amounts.

Smart Leak Detectors

There are two types of smart leak detectors: plumbed devices and external devices, according to Helix.

  • Plumbed Devices
    Plumbed devices are plumbed into your existing water lines. Most of these devices can automatically shut the water off at their point of installation, or allow you to shut your water off remotely, in case of a leak. Since these devices tap into your existing plumbing system, a licensed plumber and permit may be required for installation. Plumbed devices are typically more expensive than external devices.
  • External Devices
    External devices attach to the outside of your water meter, typically with some type of strap, making them simple to install. Since external devices are not directly attached to your plumbing system, they do not have the ability to automatically shut off your water, or allow you to shut off your water remotely, if a leak occurs. External devices are typically less expensive than plumbed devices.

Measure All of Your Water Use

To monitor indoor and outdoor water use, install the leak detector before the point where your irrigation line branches off. This way, the device can alert you of faulty irrigation programming, broken sprinklers or outdoor leaks. This is important, because outdoor use is about half of a typical home’s total water use.

To monitor indoor water use only, install a smart leak detector on your water service line after the point where your main irrigation line branches off.

Install Smart Water Leak Detector

How to install smart water leak detectors to monitor water use or leaks. Graphic: Helix Water District/Sweetwater Authority

Rebates are first come, first served

Rebates are available on a first-come, first-served basis and are not guaranteed. To be eligible for this rebate pilot program you must be a customer of either Helix Water District or Sweetwater Authority and purchase a qualifying device on or after August 1, 2019.

Questions? Customers of Helix Water District can contact Helix staff at 619-667-6226 or ; customers of Sweetwater Authority can contact Sweetwater staff at 619-409-6779 or .

Input Sought On The Future Of California’s Water Use

The California State Board of Food and Agriculture is hosting a series of public forums to allow farmers, ranchers and other stakeholders opportunities to provide input on the California’s Water Future. A meeting is set for 1-3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6 at the Sheraton Redding Hotel at the Sundial Bridge, 820 Sundial Bridge Drive in Redding. State agencies are asking Californians to help shape a road map for meeting future water needs and ensuring environmental and economic resilience through the 21st century.

The Water Shortage Is Over, So Can La Jolla Shower Like It’s 1999?

Last month, California emerged from drought conditions for the first time since December 11, 2011, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, breaking a 376-week streak. In response, the California Department of Water Resources increased the amount of water delivered from its State Water Project storage system from 35 percent of contractor requests, which it announced in February, to 70 percent. So can La Jolla residents similarly up their water use? That’s the last thing they should do, experts say, and it explains why munipical drought restrictions — three-day weekly lawn-watering, recycled water for ornamental fountains, water served in restaurants only upon request — have not and will not be lifted.

2009: Taking A Bite Out Of Water Use

Ten years ago, the state and region were facing a water crisis — snowpack levels were below normal and water restrictions were in place.

Thinking outside the box, the Water Authority sweetened its conservation outreach efforts by partnering with the San Diego-Imperial Council of the Girl Scouts to distribute water conservation tip sheets across the region with the scouts’ popular cookies.

In March 2009, 400,000 conservation cards were handed out with 2 million boxes of cookies. “Please take a few moments to implement one or more saving tips,” the cards said. “The amount of water saved could have a huge impact on our region!”

This partnership was part of a $1.8 million outreach program that helped the San Diego region prepare for potential water supply allocations. The campaign was the Water Authority’s largest advertising and marketing effort since the early 1990s.

2009: Taking A Bite Out Of Water Use

Ten years ago, the state and region were facing a water crisis — snowpack levels were below normal and water restrictions were in place. Thinking outside the box, the Water Authority sweetened its conservation outreach efforts by partnering with the San Diego-Imperial Council of the Girl Scouts to distribute water conservation tip sheets across the region with the scouts’ popular cookies. In March 2009, 400,000 conservation cards were handed out with 2 million boxes of cookies. “Please take a few moments to implement one or more saving tips,” the cards said. “The amount of water saved could have a huge impact on our region!”

Pricing California’s Water During The Drought: Can Rate Structures Provide An Incentive For Conservation?

The relationship between water pricing and water use is more nuanced than basic economic theory on supply and demand suggests. That’s what the Environmental Finance Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (EFC) found in a recent study on water pricing during the California drought. California’s severe drought and statewide conservation mandate provided an opportunity to analyze the effects of pricing strategies as a tool to prevent wasteful water use. In 2015, the State Water Resources Control Board was charged with implementing a reduction of 25 percent on the state’s local water supply agencies.

Water Use Restrictions Will Be In Place— Aqueduct Shut-Down February 23 – March 5

Valley Center Municipal Water District (District) has been advised by its wholesale supplier, that from 8 a.m. February 23, through 8 p.m. March 5, the treated water aqueduct that delivers water to the majority of the District will be shut down to accommodate inspections, maintenance and repairs by the San Diego County Water Authority. As a result, water flow to the District will be severely restricted and the water remaining in storage will be the only water available only for domestic use and fire protection during the shut-down.