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San Diego Radio DJs Promote WaterSmart Lifestyles

Well-known local radio DJs Geena the Latina from Channel 93.3, Beto Perez from Jam’n 95.7 and Tati from Star 94.1, are teaming up with the San Diego County Water Authority this summer to thank San Diegans for using water wisely and are encouraging residents to keep our region drought-safe.

While drought conditions persist across the western U.S., San Diego County has reliable water supplies thanks to investments made by the region’s ratepayers, the Water Authority and its member agencies. 

San Diego region “drought-safe” thanks to WaterSmart practices

San Diegans have adopted WaterSmart practices and continue to make the most of every drop, helping ensure there’s enough water to meet the region’s needs now and for decades into the future. Simple but important steps like washing full loads of laundry and dishes, rinsing fruit and vegetables in a bowl, and checking for leaks save water.

Radio DJs thank San Diegans

“I do my daily routine to make sure I turn off my water when I brush my teeth,” said Beto Perez. “I’m huge when it comes to preserving our water because a couple of years ago when we had the drought here in our county I was freaking out.”

Beto Perez – Jam’n 95.7

Beto Perez from Jam’n 95.7 was born in Tijuana, Mexico, and raised in South San Diego. He is a well-known on-air DJ and local favorite with more than 13 years of experience at English and Spanish radio stations, including Magic 92.5 and Z90.3.

Geena the Latina – Channel 93.3

Originally from Los Angeles, Geena the Latina has been a staple on Channel 93.3 for more than a decade. As the co-host of the Geena the Latina & Frankie V morning show, she is one of the most recognized and beloved radio personalities in San Diego.

Tati – Star 94.1

Tati of Star 94.1 began her radio career in Honolulu, Hawaii, and has followed her career from coast to coast. Most recently, she worked as a morning co-host at Jam’n 95.7 before joining Jesse and Tati in the Morning on Star 94.1.

Jon Foreman of Switchfoot

The Water Authority also recently released a video featuring musician Jon Foreman of the San Diego band Switchfoot at San Vicente Reservoir. Foreman talks about the investments the region’s water agencies and ratepayers have made to protect San Diego County’s economy and quality of life, especially during dry times.

Previous video collaborations between Foreman and the Water Authority have collectively generated hundreds of thousands of views on various digital platforms. The videos also helped to introduce new audiences to the importance of safe and reliable water supplies.

To learn more about ways to stay WaterSmart, go to watersmartsd.org.

As the Drought Persists, Here’s How Phoenix is Prepared

Water is a precious resource in a desert city like Phoenix. Community members understand the importance of water conservation to keep the city thriving. Unlike other areas in the southwest, Phoenix is not in a water shortage. While the drought is serious, Phoenix is prepared.

Over 20 years into the current drought, Phoenix continues to have access to several water supplies, including Salt, Verde, and Colorado River, groundwater reserves, and reclaimed wastewater for crops and sustainable activities. Investments in infrastructure, strategic and innovative planning on behalf of city leaders, and long-standing water conservation programs are just some of the reasons why water supplies in Phoenix will remain in good shape.

Drought: Emergency Project Being Built to Protect California Water Supplies

In a new symbol of California’s worsening drought, construction crews are putting the finishing touches on a $10 million emergency project to build a massive rock barrier through part of the Delta in Contra Costa County to preserve water supplies for millions of people across the state.

The 800-foot long barrier — the size of San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid laid on its side — is essentially a rock wall, 120 feet wide, built in water 35 feet deep.

Its purpose: To block salt water from the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay from flowing too far east and contaminating the huge state and federal pumps near Tracy that send fresh water south to 27 million people — from San Jose to Los Angeles — and to millions of acres of farmland in the Central Valley and beyond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Authority Offers to Help Parched Areas of California with Stored Supply in Central Valley

The San Diego County Water Authority’s board has directed its staff to explore opportunities to help other water districts weather an emerging drought across California.

The authority said that because of three decades of investment in supply reliability, along with a continued emphasis on water-use efficiency, the San Diego region has sufficient water supplies for multiple dry years.

Those investments include high-priority Colorado River water from the Imperial Valley, seawater desalination, and access to the Semitropic Original Water Bank in Kern County, where the authority has stored about 16,000 acre-feet of water — enough to supply more than 30,000 homes for a full year.

Water Authority Plan Shows Sufficient Supplies Through 2045

The San Diego County Water Authority’s draft 2020 Urban Water Management Plan was released for public review today. The plan highlights how regional investments in a “water portfolio approach” to supply management and a sustained emphasis on water-use efficiency mean that San Diego County will continue to have sufficient water supplies through the 2045 planning horizon — even during multiple dry years.

Urban Water Management Plan-San Diego County Water Authority

Water Authority Plan Shows Sufficient Supplies Through 2045

The San Diego County Water Authority’s draft 2020 Urban Water Management Plan was released for public review today. The plan highlights how regional investments in a “water portfolio approach” to supply management and a sustained emphasis on water-use efficiency mean that San Diego County will continue to have sufficient water supplies through the 2045 planning horizon — even during multiple dry years.

A 60-day public comment period on the draft plan ends May 6 and will include a public hearing on March 25. The Board of Directors is expected to consider adoption of the final plan during its regular meeting on May 27. The 2020 UWMP is due to the state by July 1, 2021. To read the draft 2020 Urban Water Management Plan, or to submit comments, go to http://bit.ly/Water-Authority-UWMP.

Regional investments pay off for water supply

“Thanks to decades of regional investments, the draft plan shows that we don’t need to secure more regional supply sources for the foreseeable future,” said Water Authority General Manager Sandra L. Kerl. “Instead, we are focused on helping our member agencies develop local supplies and looking for other ways we can continue to ensure supply reliability at a reasonable cost.”

The Water Authority started the current UWMP process in September 2018, coordinating closely with its 24 member agencies, most of which must submit their own plans to the state. Member agencies provided input into the draft plan as part of the Water Authority’s ongoing effort to align local and regional projections as closely as possible. The plan’s long-range demand forecast shows an increase in regional demands of less than 1% per year through 2045. This change in demand is consistent with the change forecasted by other large water suppliers, including the City of San Diego and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.

Plan is mandated by state law

Multiple supply and demand projections factor into Urban Water Management Plans, which are mandated by the state to ensure sufficient supplies over 25 years. The plans are not used to set water rates; rates are set annually based on multiple financial factors at the time, not long-term projections about water supplies.

Urban Water Management Plans are dictated by statutory guidelines, Water Authority Board direction and an agreement with the San Diego Association of Governments to use its regional growth forecast. The plans also support state laws that link approval for large housing developments to water supply availability.

By law, the plans must be updated every five years. Per state guidelines, the Water Authority’s Urban Water Management Plan includes:

  • Projected water demands under normal weather and dry weather scenarios
  • Conservation savings information
  • A process to conduct an annual water supply and demand assessment
  • Supply reliability analysis

The demand forecast accounts for changes in socio-economic factors, such as the number of projected housing units, the mix of single-family and multi-family dwellings, and employment growth.

Conservation by water ratepayers in San Diego County

Conservation projections account for continued adoption of water-use efficiency measures, compliance with landscape water-use ordinances for new residential construction, and continued installations of sustainable landscapes at existing homes. Since 1991, San Diego County ratepayers have conserved more than 1 million acre-feet of water, and per capita potable water use in the region decreased nearly 60% between fiscal years 1990 and 2019.

Urban Water Management Plan-Water Authority-Desalination Plant

The draft 2020 Urban Water Management Plan shows how regional investments by the San Diego County Water Authority in a “water portfolio approach” mean that San Diego County will continue to have sufficient supplies, including locally-controlled drinking water from the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant, the largest, most technologically-advanced and energy efficient desalination plant in the nation. Photo: San Diego County Water Authority

The draft 2020 UWMP also highlights the value of the Water Authority’s long-term strategy to invest in highly reliable and locally controlled supplies from the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant and the nation’s largest conservation-and-transfer agreement, which provides high-priority, low-cost water from the Colorado River.

In addition to the UWMP, the Water Authority also regularly updates its Regional Water Facilities Optimization and Master Plan, which focuses on the infrastructure necessary to meet projected long-term demands, and its Long-Range Financing Plan. Those documents work together to ensure the right mix of supplies and facilities to meet the region’s needs at an affordable cost.

Urban Water Management Plan-Water Authority-Primary photo-Colorado River Aqueduct

The draft 2020 Urban Water Management Plan highlights the value of the Water Authority’s long-term strategy to invest in highly reliable supplies, including the nation’s largest conservation-and-transfer agreement, which provides high-priority, low-cost water from the Colorado River. Photo: San Diego County Water Authority

Water Authority Plan Shows Sufficient Supplies Through 2045

March 8, 2021 – The San Diego County Water Authority’s draft 2020 Urban Water Management Plan was released for public review today. The plan highlights how regional investments in a “water portfolio approach” to supply management and a sustained emphasis on water-use efficiency mean that San Diego County will continue to have sufficient water supplies through the 2045 planning horizon — even during multiple dry years.

New Reservoir to Protect Local Drinking Water Deliveries

A major construction project to improve drinking water supply reliability in North County will start in February after the San Diego County Water Authority’s Board of Directors January 28 approved an $11.4 million contract for the work to Pacific Hydrotech Corporation of Perris, California.

The Hauck Mesa Storage Reservoir project includes demolition of an abandoned steel tank, building a 2.1 million-gallon storage reservoir connected to the Valley Center Pipeline, and construction of an isolation vault and an underground flow control facility. The project is expected to be completed by winter 2022.

Aqueduct Project Brought Much-Needed Boon to 1930s Banning

In 1930, while the Great Depression was worsening and the impacts of it were starting to be felt nationwide, the city of Banning received some good news. A major construction project was about to unfold in its backyard, and the city would benefit greatly. The project was the Colorado River Aqueduct of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Starting in the mid-1920s, there had been a series of studies done for bringing water from the Colorado River west to be used in the greater Los Angeles region. In December 1930, the district made the final decision to go with a route that included the San Gorgonio Pass and construction of a major tunnel under Mount San Jacinto.

Los Angeles, State Officials Discuss Increasing Local Water Supplies

Los Angeles city and county representatives hosted a discussion with state officials to address ways to increase local water supplies and to support a proposed statewide water system. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti was joined Friday by the California Secretary of Natural Resources, Wade Crowfoot, and Secretary of Environmental Protection, Jared Blumenfeld, to discuss the city’s maintenance of its water sources. “We are proud to work hand-in-hand with our state leaders to advance an agenda that protects ratepayers, preserves our environment, diversifies our water portfolio and protects our natural resources in the face of intense droughts and the rising tide of climate change,” Garcetti said.