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The Cost of Clean Water: Inflation, Supply-Chain Snarls Force San Diego to Pay $80M More for Treatment Chemicals

San Diego gave emergency authorization this week to pay an extra $80 million to chemical suppliers that say they need to sharply raise prices because of pandemic-related supply-chain issues, higher fuel costs and rising costs for raw materials due to inflation. City officials say the chemicals are essential for treating sewage and keeping drinking water clean and healthy.

San Diegans on Notice: Water Rates Could Be Rising

Come 2023, San Diegans might be paying more every time they turn on their faucet, flush the toilet or water their lawns. That’s because San Diego’s city council unanimously approved a proposal to send out notices in September for a public hearing to adjust water rates. It’s the first step before an increase. Under this proposal the rate could go up by as much as 3%.

East County Water Officials Reach Tentative Agreement With San Diego in Pipeline dispute, Officials Say

Regional leaders have reached a broad agreement to resolve a dispute threatening a massive East County water recycling plant, but many details still need to be worked out.

The conflict between the city of San Diego and the Advanced Water Purification Project emerged publicly earlier this year, just weeks before officials broke ground on the $950 million plant.

We have “operational solutions” that meet both parties’ needs, Jay Goldstone, San Diego’s chief operating officer, said in a recent phone interview.

Public Encouraged to Learn About Our Marine Environment Through Video Series on World Oceans Day

SAN DIEGO – Ahead of World Oceans Day this Wednesday, June 8, the City of San Diego is encouraging the public to learn about local coastal waters through a series of videos that describe the diverse work of its Ocean Monitoring Program in studying the effects of regional wastewater treatment processes on the marine environment.

East County’s $950M Water Recycling Project Could be in Jeopardy as San Diego Nixes Pipeline Deal

East County officials fear a $950 million sewage recycling project could get flushed down the drain because of a pipeline deal gone awry.

Leaders spearheading the endeavor blame San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria — who signed off on building an eight-mile “brine line” as recently as last year but has since reneged on that commitment.

The pipeline would prevent concentrated waste generated by the East County project’s reverse osmosis filtration system from entering into the city’s own $5 billion Pure Water sewage recycling project now under construction. Instead the byproduct would be routed into the city’s larger wastewater system.

City of San Diego Celebrates Barrett Reservoir 100 Year Anniversary

Barrett Reservoir marks its first century of service, playing an important role in the City of San Diego’s water supply system. Barrett is one of nine reservoirs that make up part of the City’s vast water system. Fishing season opens at the reservoir on May 4.

Construction of Sewage Recycling Pipeline Expected to Disrupt Neighborhoods This Summer, Fall

Neighborhoods across northern San Diego will be disrupted by tunneling and pipeline construction this summer when work kicks into high gear on Pure Water, the largest infrastructure project in city history.

With contracts totaling more than $1 billion recently awarded for eight of the 10 major projects that make up Pure Water’s first phase, city officials say nearly the entire project will be under construction starting in late summer or early fall.

Hodges Reservoir Will be Closed for Recreation During Five-Month Project

In the coming weeks, the City of San Diego will begin emergency repairs on the Lake Hodges Dam at the Hodges Reservoir in Escondido outside of Rancho Santa Fe.

During a recent inspection, the city identified areas in the dam wall that require repair and need be sealed. In order to complete the work, the water level of the reservoir needs to be lowered by about 18 feet from its current level to an elevation of 275 feet.

The repair project is expected to continue for an estimated five months.

Barrett Reservoir was created with the completion of Barrett Dam in 1922 after about three years of construction. Photo: City of San Diego

City of San Diego Celebrates Barrett Reservoir 100 Year Anniversary

Barrett Reservoir marks its first century of service, playing an important role in the City of San Diego’s water supply system. Barrett is one of nine reservoirs that make up part of the City’s vast water system. Fishing season opens at the reservoir on May 4.

“For 100 years, Barrett Reservoir has served as an integral part of our drinking water system and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future,” said Juan Guerreiro, interim director of the San Diego Public Utilities Department. “Barrett is also a popular recreation area that San Diegans enjoy.”

Barrett Dam completed in 1922

Barrett Dam was completed in 1922 and named after George Barrett who owned the land at one time at the confluence of Cottonwood and Pine Valley Creeks. Photo: City of San Diego Barrett Reservoir

Barrett Dam was completed in 1922 and named after George Barrett, who owned the land at one time at the confluence of Cottonwood and Pine Valley Creeks. Photo: City of San Diego

Barrett Reservoir was created with the completion of Barrett Dam in 1922 after about three years of construction. Named after George Barrett, who owned the land at one time, the reservoir is located at the confluence of Cottonwood and Pine Valley creeks.

Barrett captures rainwater runoff only and is not fed by imported water. The reservoir’s water storage capacity is more than 34,800 acre-feet. Water from Barrett is transferred to the Lower Otay Reservoir via the Dulzura Conduit before being treated at the City’s Otay Water Treatment Plant for distribution to customers.

Fishing reservations

Public access to Barrett has been offered on a limited basis by reservation only since 1994. Fishing season runs from May to September, and waterfowl hunting is allowed from mid-October through January. Visitors can enjoy boating, kayaking, and float tubes, and the recreation area includes picnic areas, barbecues, and restrooms.

Fishing reservations are on sale through Ticketmaster. You must buy your ticket at least one day before your fishing day. A valid California Fishing License is required for anglers 16 years of age or older. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Freshwater Sport regulations and City regulations are strictly enforced. Fish available at Barrett include largemouth bass, bullhead catfish, crappie, and sunfish.

Reservations for waterfowl hunting at Barrett are sold in advance via a lottery draw method in October.

Barrett Reservoir is located at 19886 Japatul Lyons Valley Road in Jamul. More information about Barrett and other City reservoirs: sandiego.gov/reservoir-lakes.

(Editor’s note: The City of San Diego is one of the San Diego County Water Authority’s 24 member agencies that deliver water across the metropolitan San Diego region.)

City of San Diego Celebrates 100th Year of Barrett Reservoir

SAN DIEGO – This year marks a century of Barrett Reservoir playing an important part of the City of San Diego’s water supply. Barrett is one of nine reservoirs that make up part of the City’s vast water system. Fishing season opens at Barrett on Wednesday, May 4.  

Barrett Reservoir was created with the completion of Barrett Dam in 1922 after about three years of construction. Named after George Barrett who owned the land at one time, the reservoir is located at the confluence of Cottonwood and Pine Valley creeks.  

“For 100 years, Barrett Reservoir has served as an integral part of our drinking water system and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future,” said Juan Guerreiro, Interim Director of the City’s Public Utilities Department. “Barrett is also a popular recreation area that San Diegans enjoy.”