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UCSD Says Climate Change Helped Produce San Diego’s Huge Ocean Heat Wave in 2018

UC San Diego researchers have confirmed that climate change helped produce the historic 43-day ocean heat wave that drew big crowds to San Diego beaches during the summer of 2018.

The finding was published in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, in a paper that says the phenomenon could not be solely attributed to natural variations in the weather.

‘Expect More’: Climate Change Raises Risk of Dam Failures

Engineers say most dams in the United States, designed decades ago, are unsuited to a warmer world and stronger storms.

Opinion: Ripple Effect – When Politics Ignores Science, it Jeopardizes Local Clean Water

Nine states are suing the Environmental Protection Agency for “trying to use the current public health crisis to sweep environmental violations under the rug,” according to California Attorney General Xavier Becerra.

After 30 Years and $330 Million Spent, Water Agency Shelves Las Vegas Pipeline Plan

Citing conservation gains and a third straw to the bottom of Lake Mead, the Southern Nevada Water Authority on Thursday voted to shelve a proposal for a multi-billion pipeline that would have moved water from Northern and Eastern Nevada to Las Vegas.

Oceanside Stream Restoration Grant Awarded

The California Department of Water Resources has awarded a $275,800 grant to the City of Oceanside to design a comprehensive riparian habitat and streambank restoration project for a segment of Buena Vista Creek in southeast Oceanside. The planning work will identify a feasible restoration design, conduct community outreach and complete preliminary environmental documentation for future restoration work.

Dexter Wilson Engineering to Design Rainbow’s Rice Canyon Transmission Line

Dexter Wilson Engineering, Inc., will be providing design services for a transmission pipeline from the Rainbow Municipal Water District’s Rice Canyon Water Tank.

A 3-0 Rainbow board vote April 28, with Michael Mack and Helene Brazier not able to participate in the meeting, authorized Rainbow general manager Tom Kennedy to execute a design services contract with the Carlsbad company for up to $190,880 and found that the design itself is categorically exempt from California Environmental Quality Act review although environmental review will be required for the construction.

Rainbow’s Rice Canyon Water Tank obtains potable water from Connection 10 on the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s First Aqueduct, which conveys treated water through Pipelines 1 and 2.

RWQCB Approves Camp Pendleton Waste Discharge Order Rescission

The San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board approved a rescission of the waste discharge order for Camp Pendleton’s California Sewage Treatment Plant No. 9.

The 7-0 board vote May 13 eliminates the waste discharge requirements for the Las Pulgas plant which has been replaced.

The RWQCB initially issued a waste discharge order for the plant in 1998. The sewage has since been diverted to Camp Pendleton’s Southern Regional Tertiary Treatment Plant and Northern Regional Tertiary Treatment Plant, which supports the production of recycled water for landscape irrigation and seawater intrusion mitigation.

Between 1999 and 2012 the United States Marine Corps received 12 staff enforcement letters regarding California Sewage Treatment Plant No. 9 and three notices of violation for the waste discharge order. During that time 94 violations for deficient monitoring, overflow events, and exceeding the pH limit occurred. No violations took place during the final seven years of the California Sewage Treatment Plant No. 9 operation.

Orange County Water Districts Consider Massive Lawsuit Over PFAS Contamination

Nine Orange County water agencies have retained a legal team to study whether to file suit to recoup the estimated $450 million cost of purifying drinking water in local wells contaminated with PFAS chemicals.

The PFAS compounds — long used in Scotchguard, Teflon and other products — have leached into groundwater supplies over several decades and have been linked to a variety of health problems, including cancer, liver and kidney damages and ulcerative colitis.

It’s likely that 3M and DuPont, the primary manufacturers of PFAS products, would be defendants.

As California Beaches Reopen, Seawall Construction Becomes Legislative Battleground

California’s beaches may feel off-limits right now, but the coronavirus has not stopped the sea from rising. With every tide and storm, this slow-moving disaster continues to creep closer to shore — toppling bluffs, eroding our beaches and threatening homes and major infrastructure.