City Committee Agrees Pasadena Should Dive Into Massive WaterFix Project As Demand For Water Grows

Despite some initial concerns over cost and value by some members, the Municipal Services Committee unanimously agreed to adopt a resolution in support of the California WaterFix project and California Eco Restore. Mayor Terry Tornek, a member of the committee, questioned representatives of the Metropolitan Water District as to whether or not alternative plans such as water conservation, saving rain water and similar plans, might decrease the demand for the plan, but was told that while local conservation efforts have been successful, the demand for water continues to increase.

 

SD Unified To Test All Campus Water For Lead In Coming Years

San Diego Unified School District will test every drinking fountain and kitchen sink on campuses for lead in the water over the next few years, greatly expanding on tests previously conducted by the City of San Diego. School district trustees adopted the testing plan, expected to cost $200,000, at Tuesday night’s meeting. Fixing all the faucets and sinks that are found to have a certain level of lead could cost more than $1 million over the next three to five years.

How California Can And Must Stop Wasting Its Storm Water

Californians have moved heaven and earth to get water to the state’s thirsty cities and farms. We pipe water through the nation’s longest aqueducts, store it in the tallest dams and pump it over mountains. But when it comes to the storm water that falls directly on our cities, we flush it out to sea. For California, fresh off a historic drought and suddenly the de facto leader of U.S. climate policy, wasting any water is unacceptable. That’s why Senate Bill 231, by state Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, is so important.

Oroville Dam Flaws Don’t Bode Well For Tunnels, Train Projects

Slowly — but surely — we are learning that the near-catastrophic failure of Oroville Dam’s main spillway wasn’t truly caused by weather, even though the state claims that in seeking federal aid for repairs. Rather, it resulted from poor engineering and construction when the nation’s highest dam was rising more than a half-century ago as the centerpiece of the State Water Project, and poor maintenance since its completion. The latest evidence is a huge report by a team of engineering experts, headed by Robert Bea and Tony Johnson of the University of California’s Center for Catastrophic Risk Management.

Bureaucratic Bungling On Oroville Dam Bodes Ill For Future Projects

Slowly – but surely – we are learning that the near-catastrophic failure of Oroville Dam’s main spillway wasn’t truly caused by weather, even though the state claims that in seeking federal aid for repairs. Rather, it resulted from poor engineering and construction when the nation’s highest dam was rising more than a half-century ago as the centerpiece of the State Water Project, and poor maintenance since its completion. The latest evidence is a huge report by a team of engineering experts, headed by Robert Bea and Tony Johnson of the University of California’s Center for Catastrophic Risk Management.

 

 

LADWP Sloshes In Surplus Water While Other Agencies Still Feel The Drought

On the heels of record rain and snow in California, some local water agencies are experiencing a bonanza of surplus supplies. But others that rely on groundwater are still feeling lingering effects of the state’s five-year drought. Perhaps the most visible sign of this summer’s water feast can be seen from the I-5 freeway north of Balboa Boulevard, where the historic Los Angeles Aqueduct crosses into the San Fernando Valley. It’s at that point where water in the aqueduct tumbles down an open-air staircase of concrete blocks called the Cascades.