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OPINION: San Diegans Understand Reliable Water Comes At A Price

It should surprise no one that water is costlier in San Diego County than in many other parts of the state and nation. After all, we are at the literal end of the pipeline in a semi-arid region of 3.3 million people with few significant lakes, rivers or groundwater aquifers. What is surprising is the continued insistence by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California that it will take care of San Diego County’s water needs.

What Price Are Californians Paying To Fight Climate Change?

Californians pay about 15 cents a gallon extra at the pump to fight climate change. Here’s what they’re getting for their money: continued progress in the effort to curb carbon. Greenhouse gas emissions fell by 1.5 million tons in California in 2015, state officials announced Wednesday. The reduction was the equivalent of pulling 300,000 cars off the road for a year, according to the California Air Resources Board. The agency said emissions dropped 0.3 percent compared with 2014, and have fallen a total of 10 percent since 2004.

Judge Rules That Tribe’s Case Against Coachella Valley Water Agencies Will Proceed

A federal judge Wednesday lifted a stay on legal proceedings in the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians’ lawsuit against two local water agencies involving rights to Coachella Valley groundwater supplies. U.S. District Court Judge Jesus Bernal ruled that legal proceedings should not be delayed, as questions regarding the tribe’s recently gained rights to the groundwater must be addressed without further delay.

Ready For Recycled Water?

As the drought drags on, South Coast agencies are scrambling to lay the groundwork for a potable water supply that might one day be the region’s largest, after Lake Cachuma: purified and recycled wastewater. For the past 25 years, a small amount of wastewater from sinks, tubs, and toilets has been treated and sprayed on the turf at golf courses, schools, and parks in Santa Barbara and the Goleta Valley. It’s not suitable for drinking, but it keeps the grass green.

5 Things To Know About The Oroville Dam

The Oroville Dam has been making headlines for decades, but especially since a damaged spillway in February forced the evacuation of nearly 200,000 people. Here are some things you may not know about the dam: 1. It’s the tallest dam in the U.S. At 770 feet high, the Oroville Dam tops Hoover Dam and downtown Sacramento office towers. It fares less well against the world’s tallest dams – the Jinping-I Dam in China towers over it at 1,001 feet.

It Rained Today. Is That Normal?

Yes, a cold rainy day in Sacramento in June is unusual. But hardly unprecedented. The mild storm that greeted morning commuters Thursday was the first June rainfall in Sacramento in two years, when two days of wet weather briefly interrupted the drought. Before that, the last time it rained in Sacramento in June was in 2013. In fact, Sacramento gets an average of nearly two-tenths of an inch of rain in June, according to the National Weather Service.

Are You Ready For Recycled Water?

As the drought drags on, South Coast agencies are scrambling to lay the groundwork for a potable water supply that may one day be the region’s largest, after Lake Cachuma: purified and recycled wastewater. For the past 25 years, a small amount of wastewater from sinks, tubs and toilets has been treated and sprayed on the turf at golf courses, schools and parks in Santa Barbara and the Goleta Valley – fewer than 100 sites overall. It’s not suitable for drinking, but it keeps the grass green.

OPINION: San Diegans Understand Reliable Water Comes At A Price

It should surprise no one that water is costlier in San Diego County than in many other parts of the state and nation. After all, we are at the literal end of the pipeline in a semi-arid region of 3.3 million people with few significant lakes, rivers or groundwater aquifers. What is surprising is the continued insistence by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California that it will take care of San Diego County’s water needs.