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Padre Dam Customers Will Pay More Again Over Next Five Years

Padre Dam Municipal Water District, already charging among the highest water rates in the nation, is proposing yet another five-year rate increase that officials say is necessary to maintain the agency’s services. In a 12-page notice sent out to all of Padre Dam’s 24,000 customers, the district outlined the rate increases depending on use, and the rationale supporting the increases. Starting in November, an average residential customer in Padre Dam’s district should expect their combined water and sewer monthly bill to rise to $154.75, up $3.74, or nearly $45 annually.

San Diego Water Authority Announces Rate Hike

The San Diego County Water Authority announced Thursday that staff is recommending a 3.7 percent hike in the amount of money local cities and districts pay for water in the 2018 calendar year. The authority said most of the increase was due to the price of imported water from the Metropolitan Water District, the primary wholesaler in California, and Colorado River. The SDCWA takes imported water and collected local rainfall and distributes it to local agencies like the city of San Diego, Helix Water District and the like, which sends the product on to homes and businesses.

San Diego County Water Authority Proposes 3.7 Percent Rate Hike

The San Diego County Water Authority announced Thursday that staff is recommending a 3.7 percent hike in the amount of money local cities and districts pay for water in the 2018 calendar year. The authority said most of the increase was due to the price of imported water from the Metropolitan Water District, the primary wholesaler in California, and Colorado River. The SDCWA takes imported water and collected local rainfall and distributes it to local agencies like the city of San Diego, Helix Water District and the like, which sends the product on to homes and businesses.

San Diego County Water Authority Proposes 3.7 Percent Rate Hike in 2018

Water rates in San Diego County could increase next year, if a proposed rate hike is approved. The San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA) is pushing for a 3.7 percent rate hike 2018. On Thursday, SDCWA announced it will recommend increasing rates charged to its member agencies for both treated and untreated water. The hike is party to offset higher rates and charges from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD).

Rising Sea Levels Could Mean Twice as Much Flood Risk in Los Angeles and Other Coastal Cities

The effects of rising oceans on coastal flooding may be even worse than we thought. Scientists have found that a mere 10 to 20 centimeters of sea-level rise — which is expected by 2050 — will more than double the frequency of serious flooding events in many parts of the globe, including along the California coastline.The findings, described in Scientific Reports, highlight the environmental and economic impacts of sea-level rise on coastal areas, and the need to properly predict and prepare for these effects.

Budget Cuts Threaten to Shut Down Tijuana Estuary

Federal cuts are threatening to close down the Tijuana Estuary Visitors Center, and supporters are writing letters to local Congress leaders urging them to restore funding to save a vital piece of California’s coast.  In President Trump’s budget, he is proposing to cut $250 million in grants from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Mr. Trump had previously said “these programs are a lower priority than core functions maintained in the budget such as surveys, charting and fisheries management.”

Why Big Winter Rains Haven’t Done Much to Fill San Diego Reservoirs

Even though it’s rained more than normal across California, most of San Diego’s reservoirs are still not full. About 41 percent of the storage space in these artificial lakes remains empty. Most of this is just the way things are in San Diego. Here, most of the region’s drinking water comes from the Colorado River and the melted snow of Northern California. Only about 5 percent of urban San Diego’s water comes from local rainfall.

$300 Million of Levee Work Almost Done

The Sutter Butte Flood Control Agency is close to finishing the nearly $300 million levee improvement project on the west bank of the Feather River, officials said during the agency’s annual levee meeting Wednesday. The main topic of discussion was the Feather River West Levee Project – a $297 million project to improve and reinforce about 45 miles of levee from the Thermalito Afterbay to south Sutter County. Mike Inamine, executive director of SBFCA, said the agency is expecting to complete repairs to 36 miles of the project over the next few months, which will provide 200-year flood protection from the Thermalito Afterbay to the Star Bend area in Yuba City.

 

BLOG: Reckoning Ahead For Arizona As Water Imbalance Grows On Colorado River

In Arizona, water scarcity is like the background hum of conversation in a popular restaurant: unrelenting. But even in this desert state, the ever-present strain on water supplies could soon be felt more acutely. As soon as 2019, the water level in Lake Mead on the Colorado River could drop below an elevation of 1,075 feet. That will trigger mandatory cutbacks in water diversions from the reservoir under an agreement negotiated between the federal government and three lower-basin states that rely on the river: Arizona, California and Nevada.